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Hurricane Preparedness

Start getting prepared now for hurricane season, and stay prepared throughout the year. Getting ready is as simple as recognizing hazards, gathering information, developing a plan, putting together a kit, and preparing your home. Take it one step at a time and before you know it, you will be ready.

BE PREPARED

Gathering Information: Find the latest info on tropical cyclone hazards in Hawaii by going to the NWS Honolulu's preparedness page as well as www.getreadyhawaii.org.

Developing a Plan: Answer questions like - who do you contact? Where is the nearest shelter? Where is our family/business meeting place? Where do I find information? Where are our escape routes?

Disaster Kit: Have enough non-perishable food and water for you and yours for at least seven days. Keep 10 days worth of medication on hand, and make copies of important documents. Have what you need to survive without power, while staying comfortable. http://www.prh.noaa.gov/cphc/HAW/supply_kit.php

Prepare Your Home: Reinforce your roof with hurricane clips and protect your windows with shutters and/or plywood. Pick up and store loose items in and around your home.
  • Hurricane Iniki taught us that the most important thing you can do to protect your home is to protect the openings where the wind can get in. Many yard items, sheds, fences, chairs and tables ended up smashing into someone's house, causing unnecessary damage. Make it a household project to secure your yard and neighborhood.
  • Bring in all objects that can blow away, including your mail box, garbage cans, lawn furniture, garden tools, and plants. Anchor objects that cannot be brought inside. Encourage your neighbors to do the same.
  • Install your shutters or cover all your windows and doors. Install braces on your garage doors if they do not meet the new building code.
  • Keep all windows completely closed during the storm. The old idea of leaving a window cracked open on the opposite side of the house has been proven wrong.
  • Remove your antenna(s) or satellite dishes, but be careful not to touch electrical wires. Unplug your television before taking down your antenna.
  • Disconnect natural gas to individual appliances at the supply valves near each unit. Do not turn off the main gas line. Disconnect propane gas to individual appliances, as well. Fill any propane tanks prior to the storm's arrival.
HELPFUL TIPS
  • Fill your car's fuel tank as soon as possible to avoid long lines at the station. Gasoline may not be available for days after the hurricane strikes. Pumps do not work when there is no electricity.
  • Park your car in the garage or carport. If you have neither, put the car as a close to the side of the house as possible, away from any trees that might fall on it.
  • Do not trim trees right before a storm because trash will not be collected and flying debris can be very dangerous in high winds.


TAKE ACTION

Are you Weather-Ready? Get prepared for Hurricane Season and follow these easy steps to be ready in case a storm threatens Hawaii.

Before the Season: Assemble your disaster supply kit and prepare your individual, family, and/or business plan. Check out www.ready.gov for tips and ideas.

Hurricane Watch: When a Tropical Storm or Hurricane Watch is issued (48 hours from storm arrival) - Check your disaster kit and replenish items if necessary, begin preparations around your home, and activate your plan.

Hurricane Warning: When a Tropical Storm or Hurricane Warning is issued (36 hours from storm arrival) - Follow pertinent civil defense of emergency management evacuation orders, ready your disaster kit, and prepare for arrival of tropical cyclone hazards. Get to a safe place and prepare to wait out the storm.

CATEGORIES

· Tropical Storm - winds 39-73 mph (34-63 kt)
· Category 1 - winds 74-95 mph (64-82 kt)
· Category 2 - winds 96-110 mph (83-95 kt)
· Category 3 - winds 111-129 mph (96-112 kt)
· Category 4 - winds 130-156 mph (113-136 kt)
· Category 5 - winds 157 mph and up (137+ kt)

Protecting Your Home
Hurricane Iniki taught us that the most important thing you can do to protect your home is to protect the openings where the wind can get in. Many yard items, sheds, fences, chairs and tables ended up smashing into someone's house, causing unnecessary damage. Make it a household project to secure your yard and neighborhood.
Bring in all objects that can blow away, including your mail box, garbage cans, lawn furniture, garden tools, and plants. Anchor objects that cannot be brought inside. Encourage your neighbors to do the same.
Install your shutters or cover all your windows and doors. Install braces on your garage doors if they do not meet the new building code.
Keep all windows completely closed during the storm. The old idea of leaving a window cracked open on the opposite side of the house has been proven wrong.
Remove your antenna(s) or satellite dishes, but be careful not to touch electrical wires. Unplug your television before taking down your antenna.
Disconnect natural gas to individual appliances at the supply valves near each unit. Do not turn off the main gas line. Disconnect propane gas to individual appliances, as well. Fill any propane tanks prior to the storm's arrival.
Fill your car's fuel tank as soon as possible to avoid long lines at the station. Gasoline may not be available for days after the hurricane strikes. Pumps do not work when there is no electricity.
Park your car in the garage or carport. If you have neither, put the car as a close to the side of the house as possible, away from any trees that might fall on it.
Do not trim trees right before a storm because trash will not be collected and flying debris can be very dangerous in high winds.